Hughes Hall

Dr. Pauline Essah

A senior member of Hughes Hall and an MPhil and PhD graduate of the university’s biological sciences department, Dr. Essah hails from Ghana and completed her BSc degree in agriculture at the University of Ghana, Legon. She completed her MPhil and PhD degrees from Pembroke and Churchill Colleges in biological sciences. Years after completing post-doctoral research at the Department of Plant Sciences, she returned to the university to help establish the Cambridge-Africa Programme. This Africa-focused programme is the university’s official means of engaging with African researchers and addressed the lack of any coordinated links between Cambridge and African Institutions. With the core aim of strengthening research capacity in African Institutions, the next generation of African researchers are being supported to become internationally competitive through mutually beneficial exchanges and collaborations (Cambridge-Africa, 2017).

Now the manager of the Cambridge-Africa Programme, her work draws attention to researchers working on African priorities on the continent. Pauline has been instrumental in creating partnerships with Cambridge researchers to build up Africa's own capacity. Her passion to create a sustainable research and mentoring culture through programmes such as the “Training Health Researchers into Vocational Excellence in East Africa” (THRiVE) programme, the “Cambridge-Africa Partnership for Research Excellence” (CAPREx), and many more have resulted in support to talented individuals and long term partnerships. She is also engaged in the University’s InterConnect Steering Group (an Equality & Diversity Initiative), a member of the Athena Swan Working Group (committed to advancing the careers of women in STEMM subjects) at the Department of Pathology, and a member of the Board of Trustees of the Cambridge Development Initiative, a Cambridge University student-led volunteering organisation working in Tanzania (Centre for Science and Policy, 2017).

For more information, refer to the following sources
Cambridge Africa, 2017:
Centre for Science and Policy (2017):